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Wonky Dubstep Crunking

February 22, 2013

Jason Linkins at HuffPo writes: Obama’s Sequestration Plan: Let’s Show Some Journalists How To Find It, On The Internet” taking issue with NYTimes syndicated columnist David Brooks for two reasons: first because it seems Brooks slightly exaggerated President Obama’s lack of plan for preventing sequestration, and second because Linkins doesn’t like Brooks’s metaphors.

Brooks has already appended his op-ed with a postscript to address the issue of the way he characterized the President’s fiscal planning. So this post now is about the dance metaphor in “The D.C. Dubstep“:

the “P.C. Shimmy” a dance by the Democrats

They identify a problem. They come up with a proposal to address the problem. They try to convince the country that their proposal is the best approach. … returns to Washington and congratulates himself for being the only serious and substantive person in town.

and the “Suicide Stage Dive … pioneered by Newt Gingrich”:

mount the stage and roar that they are about to courageously cut spending. … Then, when they have worked themselves up into a frenzy of self-admiration, they sprint across the stage and leap into what they imagine is the loving arms of their adoring fans. When they are 4 feet off the ground, they realize the voters have left the building in disgust and they land with a thud on the floor.

Contrary to Linkins, I like these dance terms. I do agree with Linkins that it will be nice to see NYTimes Public Editor Margaret Sullivan address questions of how op-eds are written; did Brooks choose to go with “dubstep” for the title or did some media interest think it would be good advertising? — note: I definitely paid more attention to “Florence and the Machine” at the Grammy’s after I was primed to think of them by Brooks column “Florence and the Drones”. And Paul Krugman‘s frequent use of “zombie”, is AMC paying him? But I digress, this post is about dance terms;

See generally “The Dance of Legislation” by Eric Redman.

Then consider that there is a Wikipedia entry for a type of music known as “wonky“:

Wonky (also known as street bass, aquacrunk or purple sound) is an often-debated classification of music that uses mid-range unstable synths, complex and unusual time signatures that appeared before summer 2008, among a range of musical genres, including hip hop (particularly glitch hop), IDM, grime, chiptune, dubstep, 90’s g-funk, crunk, electro and broken beat.

Note particularly the connection to “dubstep” and to “crunk” (or “krunk”). Crunk is highly related to zombies because “crunking” is a form of dance is a jerking kind of movement that resembles seizures or uncoordinated zombie movements (see also “crump”, “crumping” and “krumping“). “Krunk” can also be a sanitized swear word (What the krunk?! – as used by Conan O’Brien show 20 years ago – note Conan is scheduled to host upcoming the nerd prom correspondents dinner) and it’s also slang for partying too hard.

A YahooAnswers ask “What is the difference between crunk and dubstep?” but the answers is not clear. Based on the wikipedia pages they seem to have developed around the same times but in different parts of the world – dubstep in London, crunk in Tennessee. Snoopdizzle14 has a potentially useful youtube video for comparison purposes:

Brooks concludes:

These two dance moves, the P.C. Shimmy and the Suicide Stage Dive, when combined, are beautifully guaranteed to cause maximum damage to the country. What’s America’s biggest problem right now? It is that business people think that government is so dysfunctional that they are afraid to invest and spur growth. So what are the parties going to do? They are going to prove that government is so dysfunctional that you’d be crazy to invest and spur growth.

And finishes with a throwaway suggestion on a possible way for both sides to agree on a fix of Medicare spending – he’s such a wonk – but why would they agree when dancing is so much fun. Zombies love to dance party!

zombie david brooks

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From → economics, politics

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